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Speech Tips from The Early Learning Institute
By Diane Wolfe, Speech and Language Pathologist

Bubble Time - a Fun Way to Develop Speech Skills
Summer is a great time of year to get outside and blow bubbles! And bubbles can encourage speech development in a fun way!

  1. Encourage your child to try blowing and popping them and say “POP” and “Bubbles” while playing.
  2. Ask your child to pop the bubbles with different parts of their body and say the word like “Foot”, “Knee” or “Elbow”.
  3. Put the lid back on the container and hand it to your child so they have to make a request to ask for help, open or say more words to be able to play again.

Try these activities to help your child explore language through “hands-on” activities!

  1. Squirt a small amount of shaving cream on the kitchen table and drive small cars through it and make “Vrooom” sounds.
  2. Draw or sing “Wheels on the Bus” song which drawing with your fingers in the shaving cream making circles for wheels, and up and down for the windows opening and shutting and encourage your child to imitate your movements and speech.
  3. Add jello powder for texture or coloring and have your child identify the colors!

Encouraging Speech and Language through Art Activities
Does your child enjoy art activities? If so, here are some suggestions on speech and language development you can try while they are involved in an art project.

  1. Offering Choices – When using art materials, offer your child choices of 2 items. For example, “Do you need the red or blue paint?”, “Do you want the glue or scissors?” Sometimes a child is more inclined to answer when given a choice. Get some stickers out and let them decorate their picture, making choices of which sticker they want next,” Do you want the car or the bear?”
  2. Action Words – A lot of children know nouns such as people, places, things, their Mom, Dad, siblings’ names, or their favorite toys. Often children are missing verbs, or action words from their vocabulary. Art is a great way to incorporate those words. When playing with playdoh, imitate the child’s actions or play beside the child and show them a new action. Take little figurines and let them “jump” and “walk” making footprints in the playdoh. Roll cars through the playdoh making tire tracks and model “go” and “stop”.
  3. Puppet Role Playing - Make tongue depressor puppet of your family members, friends and pets by cutting their faces out of a photograph and pasting them on the end of a popsicle stick or tongue depressor. Place the opposite end of the stick into a ball of play dough for a base if needed. Encourage your child to talk ‘for” the puppets and “to” the puppets. Make up a story with all the family members included and make motions acting out the story.

The Early Learning Institute is an early intervention provider with over 60 years of experience. Find more activities for you and your child at www.telipa.org.

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